Last edited by Kigasida
Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

4 edition of Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav unity, 1941-1949 found in the catalog.

Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav unity, 1941-1949

by Ann Lane

  • 36 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Sussex Academic Press in Brighton, UK, Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain,
  • Yugoslavia
    • Subjects:
    • Cold War.,
    • Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- Yugoslavia.,
    • Yugoslavia -- Politics and government -- 1918-1945.,
    • Yugoslavia -- Politics and government -- 1945-1980.,
    • Yugoslavia -- Foreign relations -- Great Britain.,
    • Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- 1936-1945.,
    • Yugoslavia -- Foreign relations -- 1918-1945.,
    • Yugoslavia -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1980.,
    • Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1964.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [199]-213) and index.

      StatementAnn Lane.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDA47.9.Y8 L36 1996
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 220 p. :
      Number of Pages220
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL626397M
      ISBN 101898723273
      LC Control Number96226649
      OCLC/WorldCa35239196

      Cold War and the Income Tax.[1] This latest work by McCauleyisacompanion piece to his previously publishedThe Origins of the Cold War, [2] Both books are part of the Seminar Studies in History series and followasimilar approach of sticking to the bare new offering, however, isbetter outlined and moreFile Size: KB. The concept of Yugoslavia, as a single state for all South Slavic peoples, emerged in the late 17th century and gained prominence through the Illyrian Movement of the 19th century. The name was created by the combination of the Slavic words "jug" (south) and "slaveni" (Slavs). Yugoslavia was the result of the Corfu Declaration, as a project of the Serbian Parliament in exile and the Serbian Capital and largest city: Belgrade, 44°49′N 20°27′E .

      Civil War in China; The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution; Ideal of Permanent Revolution: Mao continued to seek a classless society. He encouraged "permanent revolution" as a means to break with China's past. The Cultural Revolution: In Mao launched the Cultural Revolution to create a proletarian culture. Mao's ideas were circulated in what came to be called his Little Red Book.   Simultaneously, the world was dividing into the two “camps” of the Cold War. The zones of occupation of Germany controlled by the US, France, and Britain became the new nation of the Federal Republic of Germany, known as West Germany, while the Soviet-controlled zone became the German Democratic Republic, or East Germany.

      Get FREE shipping on The Cold War by Klaus Larres, from This collection brings together the most influential and commonly-studied articles on the Cold War. Together with an introduction and concise headnotes, this book provides students with easy access to seminal work and an analytical framework with which. Britain in the World Economy since , by Alford, Britain, The Aftermath of Power, by Gilbert, Britain, Southeast Asia, and the On-set of the Pacific War, by Tarling, Britain, the Cold War, and Yugoslav Unity, , by Lane, Britain, The United States and the Mediterranean War, , by Jones,


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Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav unity, 1941-1949 by Ann Lane Download PDF EPUB FB2

Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity, – Ann Lane Ann Lane is the author of a number of books on southern European history, and teaches at King’s College, London, and the Defence Academy, UK.

Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav unity, [Ann Lane] -- This book sets out to examine the policy of the British Foreign Office towards Yugoslavia and. cluded support for Yugoslav unity and for stabili‐ ty in the Balkans, with which Britain began the war.

By the end of the s, as Lane notes, ‘The purpose of British war-time policy – the search for stability and order in a notoriously troublesome and dangerous region – had been achieved’ (p. Ann Lane is Lecturer in the War Studies Group at King's College London. She is author of Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity, (), and co-editor with Howard Temperly of The Rise and Fall of the Grand Alliance ().

Ann Lane is Lecturer in the War Studies Group at King's College London. She is author of Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity, (), and co-editor with Howard Temperly of The Rise and Fall of the Grand Alliance ().

show more/5(4). The editors draw on the wealth of international and multinational research on the subject to select contributions covering the origins, evolution and termination of the Cold War from to They focus particularly on the United States, former Soviet Union, Britain, Germany and France, but also look at the role of the Cold War in other parts of the world.4/5(1).

Britain's part in the Cold War has been overshadowed by a view of the contest which sees it as almost entirely a Superpower confrontation. Recent research has demonstrated the need to provide a balance to this polarized approach and to give due acknowledgement to the significant input of the British, especially in the origins of the Cold War but also in devising important international.

This chapter examines the role of Great Britain in the Cold War. It describes the condition and experiences of Britain from to and explores how Britain managed to maintain its global influence during the Cold War, despite its decline.

The chapter argues that although Britain was forced to operate within structure of the Cold War, the British state and its leaders were able to make Author: Klaus Larres.

Ann Lane. Britain, the Cold War, and Yugoslav Unity, Brighton, U.K.: Sussex Academic Press; distributed by International Specialized Book Services, Portland, Oreg. xii, $ ISBN In her book Ann Lane analyzes British involvement in Yugoslavia during and immediately after the Second World War.

Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity, – Ann Lane. Catalonia since the Spanish Civil War Andrew Dowling. Catholicism, War and the Foundation of Francoism Sid Lowe. Child Actors on the London Stage, circa Julie Ackroyd. Churchill and Spain Richard Wigg. Ann Lane is Lecturer in the War Studies Group at King's College London.

She is author of Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity, (), and co-editor with Howard Temperly of The Rise and Fall of the Grand Alliance (). 87th Congress agreement Albania Ally Betrayed Ambassador amendment American April Army Assistance Act assistance to Yugoslavia August AVNOJ Balkan Caesar Belgrade Britain British Bulgaria Bulletin Chetniks Churchill Clissold Cominform Comintern Communist Party Comrade Conference Congress cooperation Croatia December Dedijer Department Dimitrov Djilas Draza Mihailovich East economic Federal People's Republic forces foreign policy Fotich FPRY Germans Greece Greek Heretic Hungary Ibid.

Ann Lane is Lecturer in the War Studies Group at King's College London. She is author of Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity, (), and co-editor with Howard Temperly of The Rise and Fall of the Grand Alliance ().Price: $ A.

Lane () Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity – (Brighton: Sussex University Press). Google Scholar L. Lees () Keeping Tito Afloat: The United States, Yugoslavia and the Cold War, – (Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press).Author: Andrew Harrison.

‘National Refugees’, Displaced Persons, and the Reconstruction of Italy: The Case of Trieste. Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity, – (Brighton, ). Displaced Persons, and the Reconstruction of Italy: The Case of Trieste.

In: Reinisch J., White E. (eds) The Disentanglement of Populations. Palgrave Macmillan, by: 1. She is author of Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity, (), and co-editor with Howard Temperly of The Rise and Fall of the Grand Alliance ().4/5(1).

Ann Lane is Lecturer in the War Studies Group at King's College London. She is author of Britain, the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity, (), and co-editor with Howard Temperly of The Rise and Fall of the Grand Alliance (). Reviews "The Cold War is /5(4). The Cold War (–) is the period within the Cold War from the Truman Doctrine in to the conclusion of the Korean War in The Cold War emerged in Europe a few years after the successful US–USSR–UK coalition won World War II in Europe, and extended to – InBernard Baruch, the multimillionaire financier and adviser to presidents from Woodrow Wilson to Harry S.

Buy Cold War: The Essential Readings (Blackwell Essential Readings in History) by Larres, Larres (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on 4/5(1). The Cold War was a period of geopolitical tension between the Soviet Union and the United States and their respective allies, the Eastern Bloc and the Western Bloc, after World War II.

The period is generally considered to span the Truman Doctrine to the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Ann Lane has 15 books on Goodreads with 29 ratings. Ann Lane’s most popular book is Wild Emm - Child of Iceland. the Cold War and Yugoslav Unity by. Refresh and try again. Rate this book. Clear rating.

1 of 5 stars 2 of 5 stars 3 of 5 stars 4 of 5 stars 5 of 5 stars. Britain, Yugoslavia and the Making of the Cold War: Coming.IB History: The Cold War, Chapter 2.

meh. STUDY. PLAY. Declaration of Liberated Europe. Agreement at the Yalta Conference affirming the right of occupied states to national self-determination. Commits the US, Britain, and the USSR to encourage the formation of democratic governments.

Cold War: Chapter 5, pages 15 terms. In The Cold War: A Military History, David Miller, a preeminent Cold War scholar, writes insightfully of the historic effects of the military build-up brought on by the Cold War and its concomitant effect on ng together for the first time newly declassified information, Miller takes readers inside the arsenals of the superpowers, describing how intercontinental ballistic Brand: St.

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