Last edited by Yokasa
Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

5 edition of The Somersetshire Coal Canal and railways found in the catalog.

The Somersetshire Coal Canal and railways

by Kenneth R. Clew

  • 236 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by A. M. Kelley in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain.
    • Subjects:
    • Somersetshire Coal Canal.,
    • Railroads -- Great Britain.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 170-171.

      Statementby Kenneth R. Clew. With a foreword by Hugh Stockwell.
      SeriesInland waterways histories
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHE437.S6 C55 1970b
      The Physical Object
      Pagination176 p.
      Number of Pages176
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4438425M
      ISBN 100678056609
      LC Control Number79094496
      OCLC/WorldCa78032

      This is the story of the Somersetshire Miners Association. Coal mining was carried on continuously for more than years in the Radstock area of Somerset until the pits were deemed uneconomic in the early s. The Somersetshire Miners Association was formed in , and became a constituent union of the Miners Federation of Great Britain in. From Graces Guide. The Somerset Coal Canal (originally known as the Somersetshire Coal Canal) was a narrow canal in England, built around with basins at Paulton and Timsbury via Camerton, an aqueduct at Dunkerton, Combe Hay, Midford and Monkton Combe to Limpley Stoke where it joined the Kennet and Avon Canal.

        A short history of the northern and southern branches of the Somersetshire Coal Canal along the valleys of the Cam and Midford Brooks. It transported coal . The Somersetshire Coal Canal was a narrow canal in Somerset, built around starting in basins at Paulton and Timsbury to nearby Camerton, over two aqueducts at Dunkerton, through a tunnel at Combe Hay, then via Midford and Monkton Combe to Limpley Stoke where it joined the Kennet and Avon link gave the Somerset coalfield, (which at its peak contained 80 collieries), access east.

      Bibliography. The list which follows is by no means exhaustive, but the books and articles listed give a good overview of the subject. Niall Allsop, "The Somersetshire Coal Canal Rediscovered" (Bath: Millstream Books, ) John Anstie, "The Coal Fields of Gloucestershire and Somersetshire, and their Resources" (London: Edward Stanfield, ).   Books and journals Clew, K R, The Somersetshire Coal Canal and Railway 'Country Life' in 6 April, () Legal This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.


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The Somersetshire Coal Canal and railways by Kenneth R. Clew Download PDF EPUB FB2

"The Somersetshire Coal Canal and Railways" Kenneth R. Clew (Brans Head) The history of the canal from its planning and construction, through its working life and the subsequent building of the railways. Out of print but available from second-hand book shops. The Somersetshire Coal Canal and railways.

M We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. Contents. List of Illustrations. 8: Entrance to the Somersetshire Coal Canal Cam brook Camerton canal basin Canal Lock carried Clandown Coal Canal Company coalfield coalworks collieries Collieries Minute Book Combe Hay Combe Hay locks.

Buy Somersetshire Coal Canal and Railways (Inland Waterways History S.) First Edition by Clew, Kenneth R. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and The Somersetshire Coal Canal and railways book delivery on eligible orders.5/5(1).

SOMERSETSHIRE COAL CANAL Co. DISCOVER the River Valleys. DISCOVER the Railways. DISCOVER the Cyclepaths. DISCOVER the Canal. Dundas and Avoncliff Aqueducts. Wooden and iron drain plug pulleys. water powered pump at Claverton. Tow rope marks in the corners of bridges.

THE SOMERSETSHIRE COAL CANAL AND RAILWAYS. An Illustrated History. by Clew (Kenneth R) and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The Somerseshire Coal Canal & Railways by Kenneth and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Radstock was the terminus for the southern branch of the Somerset Coal Canal which was subsequently turned into a tramway and became the centre for railway development and coal depots, coal washeries, workshops and a gas works.

As part of the development of the Wiltshire, Somerset and Weymouth Railway. Somerset & Dorset Railway Trust: Available Products - Membership, Memorabilia, S&D Timetable Reprints, Books, DVDs, Make a Donation, Limited Edition OO Gauge Wagons, The S&DRT photo collection, Magazine back-issues: printed, Fridge Magnet Totem Signs, A.

Railways – general. Careering with Steam by Arthur Turner £ Isambard Kingdom Brunel by Robin Jones £ Traction Engines by George Watkins £ Canals.

English canals explained by Stan Yorke £ Somersetshire Coal Canal: A Second Pictorial Journey by Roger Halse £ The Coal Cut at Coleford by Robin Bradbury £ Five.

The Clandown Branch began life as one of the many narrow-gauge feeder tramways to the Somersetshire Coal Canal at Radstock, in this case as a connection to Middle Pit and Old Pit collieries.

This tramway was known to have been in existence by and at that time it is believed to have been of 3' 5½" gauge, but about it may have been. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Clew, Kenneth R. Somersetshire Coal Canal and railways.

New York, A.M. Kelley [] (OCoLC) Document Type. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: pages, plate illustrations (including 1 color), facsimiles, maps 23 cm: Series Title. The Somerset Coal Canal (originally known as the Somersetshire Coal Canal) was a narrow canal in England, built around Its route began in basins at Paulton and Timsbury, ran to nearby Camerton, over two aqueducts at Dunkerton, through a tunnel at Combe Hay, then via Midford and Monkton Combe to Limpley Stoke where it joined the Kennet and Avon uction began: The Somersetshire Coal Canal was built to carry coal from the Paulton and Radstock coal fields to the Kennet and Avon Canal.

Although the coal was relatively plentiful and there were markets for it across the South of England, sales had been small and prices high because the roads of the area were exceptionally poor. DISCOVER the Canal. Dundas and Avoncliff Aqueducts. Wooden and iron drain plug pulleys.

water powered pump at Claverton. Tow rope marks in the corners of bridges. Quarter mile posts showing distance from the river Thames at Reading. Widcombe flight of locks accessing river navigation to Bristol. The Somersetshire Coal Canal Rediscovered: A Walker's Guide.

Bath: Millstream Books. ISBN Clew, Kenneth R (). The Somersetshire Coal Canal and Railways. Bran's Head Books. ISBN Cornwell, John (). Collieries of Somerset and Bristol. Landmark Publishing Ltd.

ISBN Halse, Roger; Castens, Simon. The Somerset Coal Canal (originally known as the Somersetshire Coal Canal) was a narrow canal in England, built around from basins at Paulton and Timsbury via Camerton, an aqueduct at Dunkerton, Combe Hay, Midford and Monkton Combe to.

Kenneth R Clew ( David & Charles: Newton Abbot) The Somersetshire Coal Canal and Railways, pp. 80 & 94) The success of the canal can, perhaps, be explained by the absence of any competition prior to the arrival of the railways, when it was the only route by which a large number of collieries were able to gain any access to markets beyond.

of 41 results for Books: "somerset canal" Skip to main search results Amazon Prime. Somersetshire Coal Canal Rediscovered: A Walker's Guide. by Niall Allsop Somersetshire Coal Canal and Railways (Inland Waterways History) by Kenneth R.

Clew | 16 Apr out of 5 stars 1. Hardcover More buying choices £ (9 used offers). The Somersetshire Coal Canal A Second Pictorial Journey. Roger Halse 56 pages Softback Originally published by Millstream, this is a delightful collection of images of the Somersetshire Coal Canal, built at the beginning of the Eighteenth Century and closed by railway competition by.

The Somersetshire Coal Canal ad Railways. We are in the process of reviewing this item.Known as the Somersetshire Coal Canal, this project was to have important consequences for the parish of Timsbury.

The route of the main line of the canal was surveyed by John Rennie and assisted by William Smith, who later became famous for being the ‘Father of English Geology’.This account traces the origins of the line against the background of the Somerset Coalfield and the Somersetshire Coal Canal, the complicated evolution of the Bristol & North Somerset Company, and details the Camerton branch until the early years of the present ts headings are as follows - 1.

The Somersetshire Coalfield and Canal.